Chronicle of Michael the Great (Syrian) about the Magi of the Nativity.

Chronicle of Michael the Great (Syrian) about the Magi of the Nativity. Greeks, their kings, Michael, say, “The Chronicle”, have, according to, Gregory, eight, Teshri, nobles, the Syrian, whom, Jerusalem, Nyssa, prophecy, came, first, Edessa

The picture shows the manuscript page of 1432, containing the translation of the Chronicles of Michael the Great into the Armenian language (the translation was made in the XIII century).
In the western tradition, the wise men (magicians) are traditionally three. However, the Eastern tradition calls a different number. This is what the Syro-Orthodox (Jacobite) Patriarch of St. Michael the Great (also known as Michael the Syrian):
About magicians.
Eusebius [Caesarea] and Gregory of Nyssa [1] say that they are descendants of Balaam [2]. Jacob of Edessa [3] says that they are from the gensa of Elam, the son of Shem. Others [say they] are descendants of the kings of Shab and Saba, according to the prophecy of David, and that they have three kings, because they have three types of sacrifices (aurbane). Others say that they have eight, according to the prophecy of Moses, which says: “I called upon him [the people of magicians] seven shepherds and eight noblemen [chapters - raurbane]”. Map Jacob says: “Twelve noble [heads]”.And they find in the writings of the Persians a story telling that they have three thousand horsemen (parase) and five thousand fast walkers (thebalare). Having reached Kallinika, which is Cancer, they learned that great hunger reigns in Judea. These nobles left there a large part of [their people], while they themselves went to Bethlehem with a thousand people. They worshiped, offered sacrifices, and returned. Here are their names: Dhadnour, son of Artaban; Vashkaf [or Vashtaf?], Son of Gudzhir; Arshak, son of Mahduk; Zervand, son of Warudud; Ariwah, son of Cosro; Artachishir [Artaxerks], son of Holit; Eshtanbuzan, son of Shiigravan; Mahduk, the son of Havahma; Ahshiresh, son of Sahban; Sardanas the son of Baladan; Marduk, the son of Bil. And the king who sent them is Pir-Shabur [4].
Mages came [to Jerusalem] in the year 45 of August [5] (7 AD) ... Indeed, in the 314 year of the Greeks (3 AD) in the month of July [September], [6] on the 24th day of the moon, John was conceived of the son of Zechariah, and he was born 24 Haziran [June] the 315th year of the Greeks (4 AD). Mother of God Mary received the message of the 25th adar [March] of the same year, and the Lord [Christ] was born the 25th of the first eve [December] of the 316th year of the Greeks (5 CE). After eight days, he was circumcised in Bethlehem, and after 40 days they demolished him in the temple of Jerusalem. Simeon carried him on his arms.From there they went to Nazareth and in the year 318 of the Greeks (7 g. E.), which is the second year of the Lord, returned to Jerusalem and to Bethlehem. Then the magicians came there to worship him.
Mages are called kings of their heads, and their power is inherited (irtuta). They pay tribute (mdata) to their head.
http://www.vostlit.info/Texts/rus4/Mychel_Syr/frameotryv1.htm
Notes:
1. Gregory of Nyssa (c. 331-394) is a church leader in the times of the decline of the Roman Empire. He was the Bishop of Nissa (in Cappadocia), to which he owes his nickname. He wrote a number of writings.
2. Balaam - the Mesopotamian Magus, or soothsayer, whose name is found in biblical history.
3. Jacob of Edessa, the author of the 7th century, originally from the province of Antioch; at one time he was the bishop of Edessa, to whom he owes his nickname His historical work “The Chronicle” was modeled after the “Canon” of Eusebius of Caesarea (his “Chronicle” continued the work of the latter). The “Chronicle,” beginning from the 5th century, brings the narration of events to 692, in which it was written. Anonymous author continued to work until 710. Mikhail Syrian used it in the I-X books of his Chronicle.
4. Interspersed here are, in all likelihood, the names of the ancient Iranian kings.
5. August - Roman emperor, 27 BC. er - AD 14 er
6.

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