I command the highest: Unusual edicts of Russian rulers

20-04-2018, 21:11
How bans emperors and empresses coped with their own complexes, regulate the traffic, fought the "harmful fun" and about one piquant decree of Peter I.

I command the highest: Unusual edicts of Russian rulers


Peter the First and the bell

I command the highest: Unusual edicts of Russian rulers

Peter I thoroughly shook Russia with his decrees. Hacked through the window in Europe, Peter famously, but did not forget about the little things. For example, decrees concerning the appearance of the subjects, at least 17 were issued. Like our modern lawmakers Peter did not always think about how his decree would be to execute. In 1715, the king forbade walking on the wooden St. Petersburg pavement in iron-padded shoes to increase the lifespan of these most bridges. The decree was pretty tough: "... so from now on henceforth staples and nails, than men's and women's boots were knocked down, nobody did not trade and did not have them; also no one, what rank can anyone was, with such a score of boots and shoes did not wear; and if anyone with such boots or boots will be a pile, and those will be cruelly fined, and merchant people who will keep such staples and nails will be exiled to penal servitude; and their possessions shall be taken by His Great Sovereign. "After when the decree came into force, the streets were empty for some time, Petersburgers just had no other shoes.
Very detailed Peter was regulated by human behavior on secular parties, assemblies. The party-goer needed to come "Myta diligently, without skipping these places "and" Brit carefully, in order To women's tenderness, bristle disgusting, do not cause damage. " moderately, and drink "plenty" because "the glory that choked on its sins! For this death in Russia since ancient times is honorable. "Flirtation was also regulated: "Being without a wife, and God forbid, single, look at the charms of the ladies not with open greed, but from under the tishka - they notice this too. Not hesitate - you will respect them in such a manner, and you will not miss the impudent one. "

I command the highest: Unusual edicts of Russian rulers

After the establishment of the Senate in Russia, Peter I issued a curious decree. in relation to senators: "I continue to indicate to gentlemen to senators the speech in Presence not to keep written, but tokmo in your own words, so that dope everyone was visible to everyone. "In our DG such a law will be hacked in the first reading.
One of the most unusual edicts appears in the legendary story about Peter and the bell. This is a historical anecdote rather than a real document. and it is known in several ways. We give two of them.
They say that Alcaeus Tolstoy, when he wrote his never finished the novel "Peter I," sat a lot in the archives and one document attracted him pulled off When friends came to him, he told them that when Peter fought with the Swedes, he lacked guns and then had to turn to the church, ask for the bells to be melted down. Priests the sovereign could not refuse, but they did it reluctantly and asked Peter Alekseevich sign a piece of paper according to which the guns after the war would be poured back to the bells. The Northern War ended, and the king I did not hurry to return the favor. The churchmen tactfully reminded the ruler when the help of his written promise. Having told the story to this point, the count, barely suppressing laughter, got out of the closet and showed his guests A document with the answer of Peter the Church. The old scroll has a signature on it. king and a short resolution: "X @ nd you!".
There is also such a variant of this tale, according to which the priests after the death of Peter I tried to return the bell, turning to Catherine I. The Empress carefully studied the history of Peter’s correspondence with the church and replied: "It was necessary to take what was proposed by Tsar Peter Alekseevich. I but sinner, and I cannot give it to you. "
Anna Ioanovna and traffic rules

I command the highest: Unusual edicts of Russian rulers

The first rules of the road were established in mid XVII century when Alexei Mikhailovich (for the first time he attended to the purity Moscow streets, see the post link). Peter forbade beating passers-by with a whip, and Anna Ioanovna in 1730 established a punishment for violation of traffic rules: "cab drivers and other all sorts of officials people ride, having horses bridled, with every fear and caution, attention. For disobeying guilty in the first guilt will be cats, for the second - the whip, and for the third they will be sent to hard labor. " By the way, two years later Anna Ioanovna toughened the punishment for repeated violations, whipping of passers-by, hitting a pedestrian: "... such, as guilty, severe punishment will be repaired or death penalty. "So, if the worst offenders Mara Baghdasaryan and MP Slutsky would have lived 300 years ago, they would have been carved first, and then would chop off the head.
Elizaveta Petrovna and hair

I command the highest: Unusual edicts of Russian rulers

Elizaveta Petrovna also made her contribution to the development of traffic in Russia. She decided to seize in favor of the state transport the means of the delinquent: "If anyone rides on horses, those through the police teams to catch and send the horses to the stable sovereign. "
Some decrees of the "merry Elizabeth" had no practical use. for the state. Once Elizaveta Petrovna powdered her hair with burnt hair powdered. Imperial hair stuck together, and the situation was so serious that Petrovna, just like the county leader nobility after the "Titanic", had to get a haircut bald. To not suffer from such a lonely failure Elizabeth issued a decree that obliged all court ladies to shave and wear black wigs the established sample. This decree from 1747 went down in history as "Hair establishment".
Paul's bans

I command the highest: Unusual edicts of Russian rulers

Pavel I would quickly find a common language with modern deputies, because He loved to forbid everything. As the son of Catherine the Great, though not very beloved, Paul continued his mother’s policy towards France. In 1793 Catherine II, frightened by the spread of "harmful" ideas of the French revolution, issued a decree "On the termination of communications with France on the occasion of the perturbation and killing of King Louis XVI and about the expulsion of the French from Russia, excluding those who are under oath will renounce the revolutionary rules that have spread in France. "A little Previously, she ordered to ban the import of French books, newspapers and magazines. Pavel, in turn, banned the importation into Russia not only French, but also generally foreign books and even notes: "Through the exported From abroad various books are applied to the debauchery of faith, civil laws and then, from now on, until the decree, we are commanded to prohibit admission because boundaries of any kind of books in whatever language they are, in the state ours, evenly and music. "Marseillaise under Pavel humming or playing It was more dangerous than listening to the Voice of America in the Soviet years.

I command the highest: Unusual edicts of Russian rulers

Fearing the influence of the French Revolution, Paul banned even wide-brimmed French hats in 1797: "... declare utmost in the city, besides triangular hats and ordinary round hats, no no one else wore ...And if anyone, in opposition to this, appears, to present immediately to the custody of his Excellency. "
Young people were not allowed to travel abroad or enter foreign universities so the emperor defended the young and immature minds of freethinking (such a ban was recently introduced in Turkmenistan).
Following the example of Elizabeth Petrovna, Pavel legislated with her own complexes.
He banned sideburns, because they themselves grew very poorly. He banned the waltz, because he danced badly and once in public view crashed, but then at the request of his favorite Lopukhina.
Invincible fist fights

I command the highest: Unusual edicts of Russian rulers

Fist fights or wall-to-wall fights from ancient times existed in Russia. Neither One holiday did not do without cheerful Russian massacre. Church not encouraged the fist fights, because the pagans dedicated them to Perun, patron of martial arts in Russia. To fight at the state level with Russian boxing began Mikhail Fedorovich. The decree of 1641 stated that those who "learn to fight" should "be brought into the Zemsky order and to punish. "
In 1684, when the regent under Peter and his brother Ivan was the princess Sophia, issued a decree "On the prohibition to shoot houses with rifles, to start fisticuffs and ride the cab drivers on azhzh "in which the punishment for violated the ban once and for repeat offenders differed essentially: "... and to repair those people for their guilt for the first drive to beat bathogs, and have money by decree, after another drive to beat the whip, Yes, you have half the money, and in the third order, by repairing the cruel punishment, beat with a whip and exile into exile in Ukrainian cities to the eternal life. "By the way, the death penalty referring to the Ukrainian cities, that is, in Siberia, replaced in 1653, Alexei Mikhailovich.

I command the highest: Unusual edicts of Russian rulers

Decree of Catherine I "On the non-existence of fistfights without permission Police Office’s Chancellery ”of 1726 prohibited the conduct of battles without coordination with the police. However, the authorities did not intervene uncoordinated battles, as they simply were afraid not to cope with a crowd of heated fighters. Finally finish the battle decided Nicholas I, having issued an order to ban fistfights, calling them in the decree "fun hurt". It is clear that if the link to Siberia to "eternal life" did not discourage Russian desire to beat the wall against the wall, then the ban Nikolay changed the situation insignificantly.

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I command the highest: Unusual edicts of Russian rulers

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I command the highest: Unusual edicts of Russian rulers

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