"Kuban Cossacks" and Stalinist propaganda.

"Kuban Cossacks" and Stalinist propaganda. film, film, Kuban, he’s, the film, Kuban, life, which, songs, films, Kuban, after, actors, many, Stalin, Cossacks, very, propaganda, now

So, friends, today there will be a post about one of the pillars of Stalinist propaganda - the film "Kuban Cossacks". Lenin also said that cinematography is the most important for the Bolsheviks, since visual propaganda works best - most of the information about the world around a person is received through vision, and visual images work best.
Old Krupsky himself did not have time to take part in the mass creation of film propaganda samples, but all these things flourished under Stalin with the advent of color and sound cinema. In the period of 1930-50s in the USSR they will create a lot of films that will praise Stalin and Stalinism - then he almost single-handedly wins the war, and all the "liberated nations" listen to him (as in the movie "The Fall of Berlin") he almost single-handedly wins the “Civil War” (as in the film “The Fires of Baku”), otherwise he just enjoys the achievements of the national economy from portraits, as in the film “Kuban Cossacks”.
What is the saddest thing is that many now take these propaganda agitators as real life shots in the Stalinist USSR. Which, of course, had nothing to do with reality, and in today's post we will see it clearly. Come under the cat, it is interesting. Welladd friendsDo not forget)
What is this movie about?
"Kuban Cossacks" and Stalinist propaganda. film, film, Kuban, he’s, the film, Kuban, life, which, songs, films, Kuban, after, actors, many, Stalin, Cossacks, very, propaganda, now

To begin with, I’ll tell you a little about what this film is all about and how it was born. The film was shot at the Mosfilm studio in 1949 by the famous director of the times of Stalinism, Ivan Pyryev, the premiere of the film took place on February 26, 1950, during the life of the great land reclaimer and film critic.
The film script is quite simple and built on the principle of "our response to America." By the way, very many films of the 1930-50s are built according to this principle - the directors watched American films about a successful and rich life, and then thought about how to adapt something like that for the Soviet system and make their own movies. The Kuban Cossacks cinema became such a film - it was the Soviet response to American films of the 1930s about the lives of farmers.
In the plot of the film, the two Kuban collective farm "Red Partisan" and "Precepts of Ilyich" are competing with each other in socialist competition.The delegations of both collective farms go to the fair, where the love line of the two collective farm chairmen Gordey Voron and Galina Peresvetova appears. At the autumn fair, you can see an incredible abundance of goods, the tables are full of food, and all the people dance and sing cheerful songs.
A film full of Stalinist propaganda.
To begin with, it must be said that there were no fairs in Kuban at all - either in the times before the film or after. The only "fair" was completely invented for the film - tables and counters were set near the old elevator in one of the collective farms. At the elevator building itself, a huge portrait of Stalin was pulled out, which was cut out of tape in the process of later editors.
"Kuban Cossacks" and Stalinist propaganda. film, film, Kuban, he’s, the film, Kuban, life, which, songs, films, Kuban, after, actors, many, Stalin, Cossacks, very, propaganda, now

Tables full of food are a complete and hopeless lie. According to the memoirs of artists - most of the fruits in the film were fake, made of wax or papier-mâché (such are used, for example, in still lifes). The same lie was the abundance of "goods" - they were collected for the film almost all over the Kuban.
"Kuban Cossacks" and Stalinist propaganda. film, film, Kuban, he’s, the film, Kuban, life, which, songs, films, Kuban, after, actors, many, Stalin, Cossacks, very, propaganda, now

In order for you to better imagine what poverty really was, I would also say that even the balloons that were in the film were given to the actors for a while, and then they were taken away.It was a terrible deficit brought for filming from the capital.
The capital's white-toothed Moscow actors in the film look very polished and do not look like the collective farmers who worked under the scorching sun all summer. And yet the artists' conversation is completely different - they speak Kuban in surzhik, and not in “Russian announcer”. Although the actors diligently and articulate fricative "g", but it is unnaturally obeyed.
"Kuban Cossacks" and Stalinist propaganda. film, film, Kuban, he’s, the film, Kuban, life, which, songs, films, Kuban, after, actors, many, Stalin, Cossacks, very, propaganda, now

All the "folk" songs in the film that the actors sing on the way to the fair are in fact no folk songs, but created by the composer Isaac Dunaevsky. There is not a single real Kuban song in the film.
Initially, the film was supposed to be called Merry Fair, but Stalin personally renamed it. The great film critic and nutritionist personally watched the film before the show, saw his own portrait on the wall of the elevator and thoughtfully said, “But still we are good at farming! I always knew that we live very well in the village.” That is, he believed in his own propaganda.
"Kuban Cossacks" and Stalinist propaganda. film, film, Kuban, he’s, the film, Kuban, life, which, songs, films, Kuban, after, actors, many, Stalin, Cossacks, very, propaganda, now

So, to summarize, what we were actually shown in this film - well-fed metropolitan actors, posing as Cossacks, go to a non-existent in fact fair, where they “sell” fake fruits and sing “folk” songs that don't exist in nature.This is the whole essence of "Stalinist art."
What was in the Kuban in fact.
"Kuban Cossacks" and Stalinist propaganda. film, film, Kuban, he’s, the film, Kuban, life, which, songs, films, Kuban, after, actors, many, Stalin, Cossacks, very, propaganda, now

And now let's see what actually happened in the Kuban region at the end of the forties. First, in fact, Kuban was one of the affected regions during the famine of 1932–33 — in fact, the Soviet authorities starved the Cossacks, who dared to oppose it in 1917–20. As Kaganovich said at a meeting of the CPSU (b) - "Representatives of the kulaks are still in the village of Kuban, they are broken by us, battered, have lost their former power, but are still alive." In the mid-thirties, the Kuban villages stood empty of hunger.
The famine of the post-war years did not bypass the Kuban either - the Kuban was one of the most affected regions during the famine of 1946-48. Like the famine of the 1930s, the famine of the post-war years was completely man-made - in 1946, Stalin ordered to send 5 million tons of grain abroad (2 million tons more than the pre-war level), and famine, which persisted until 1948, came to the village again.
And now look at the year the film was created - "Kuban Cossacks" were filmed in 1949 onactually starved Kubanwhere to imitate the "happy Soviet life" they sent fattened metropolitan artists, scarce balloons, plastic fruits and a huge portrait of Stalin.
What is most funny and at the same time sad - many people after watching the film "Kuban Cossacks" really decided that everything shown in the film is true. People moved to the Kuban in the hope of seeing with their own eyes all the wonders shown in the film - instead of this seeing the devastated fields and half-starved local ...
What happened after.
An interesting fact - for the incredibly odious Stalinist propaganda, the film was forbidden even in the USSR itself - it came under the ban under Khrushchev for "lacquered reality." Breaking from the abundance of tables in the movie became a kind of symbol of Stalinism in art.
Under Brezhnev, the cinema was again returned to the rental and television network - this happened in 1968, by the twentieth anniversary of the film’s release. From the tape cut out the mention of Stalin and removed the frames with his huge portrait on the old elevator.
But now the movie is shown on TV again, often giving it off as “true footage of life in Stalin’s USSR” - and many of the young people believe that this is exactly how it was. There are fans of the film and from the professional environment - director Sergei Solovyov once stated that "The Kuban Cossacks are a grandly truthful power of the empire."
Well, for me, “empire's energy industry” is not staged films with plastic fruits, but “Kolyma stories” by Varlam Shalamov. Grand and truthful.
Write in the comments what you think about this, interesting.




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